Hola de Xela! 🇬🇹

¡Buenos días a todos!

Here I am at the moment, sitting in a cozy Guatemalan coffee shop, drinking an amazing latte (made with local beans), eating a vegan chocolate cake and writing this over-due blog post (tough life huh? 😌). I moved to the hippie-outdoorsy city of Xela five weeks ago para aprender español. I have always dreamed to learn a third language (unfortunately Chinese and I didn’t quite get along!) so I decided that Spanish was my best option (and I have in mind to travel to South America later this year!). After researching online and talking with my dear colleagues in China, I chose to come to Guatemala which is currently a very hot (and cheap!) destination to learn Spanish. Let’s not forget to mention that the country offers spectacular volcanoes hikes, some of the best Maya ruins in the world, glorious lakes and of course awesome coffee AND chocolate! I didn’t think twice before buying my one-way ticket! ☺️

Xela (short for ‘Quetzaltenango) is the second largest city in Guatemala where foreigners come either to hike, volunteer or learn Spanish (I came for all three!). Today, I am starting my 5th week of classes in the lovely family-run El Quetzal school. Every student at the school receives one-on-one lessons in the morning for 4 or 5 hours. In the afternoon, the school organises plenty of activities for us such as cooking classes, salsa classes, visits to museums, hikes in the countryside etc. In order to have the full immersion, I opted to stay with a local family (that doesn’t speak a word English of course!). At first, family dinners were definitely putting me out of my comfort zone! However, in four weeks only, I went from mumbling a few words into telling stories about my weekends’ hikes. I am also teaching English once a week to a small group of chicas at my school. It feels good to give a little bit of my time while doing what I like! So far, my stay in Xela has been muy bueno! No doubt I have a hard time leaving!

The 1st of November was El Dia de los Muertos; a day celebrated throughout Latin America where people commemorate the deceased. In Guatemala, families go to the cemetery for the day to eat, pray, play music and spend time with their loved ones who have died. Contrary to what one would expect, it a very happy and festive day! I have never seen cemeteries with that much colours, music and joy! Families come to paint, clean and decorate the graves a few days prior so that everything is perfectly ready for November 1st! As for myself, I decided to go to Sumpango for the day to attend the famous kite festival -another tradition of El Dia de los Muertos. The festival is also a prestigious kite competition where several groups work for months to build kites ranging from 3 meters to 30 meters high! After they have been judge on their aesthetic, the groups try to fly their kite for as long as they can (some flew for 2 hours, some only 5 seconds!). The atmosphere was surreal during the competition, so much excitement! What a great first Dia de los Muertos!

Only two more weeks left in Xela before I start my travels around this beautiful country! I must say I am very excited to finally pack my bag and explore Guat! Hasta pronto mis amigos! I’m heading to my yoga class now! ✌🏻

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Me fui a ser feliz, no se cuando vuelva ✌🏻

Kenya, a country of diversity 

My two months journey in East Africa began and finished in the fascinating country of Kenya. I remember when I first landed in Nairobi; seeing skyscrapers, highways, shopping malls everywhere for the first time in Africa was almost shocking! I felt like I was on another continent! What surprised me the most however was the multiculturalism, especially in metropolis like Nairobi and Mombasa. Through the years, Kenya became a melting pot of traditional tribes, urban families, expats and of course tourists from around the world. I could finally walk in the streets or in the grocery store without being the odd one because of my skin color!


Not only Kenya has a vibrant ethnic culture, but the country also offers a vast palette of landscapes. I started my journey in the mountains by trekking Mount Kenya. Then I experienced my first game drive in the Masai Mara National Park, The Lion King’s inspired savannah. Finally, I wrapped up my Kenyan trip by sunbathing on the sugar-powder beaches of the Swahili Coast. This rich diversity of environments, activities and cultures will please any traveler. It surely worked for me considering I extended my stay for a few weeks! Tanzania, I will have to come back for you another time! Kenya, thanks for all the beautiful memories and friends I have made. You have a dear place in my heart! ❤️


Population: 44 millions

Capital: Nairobi

Languages: Swahili and English

Traditional dish:

-Nyama choma (barbecued meat, often goat)

-Ugali (cornmeal dough)

-Masala chai (very sweet spiced tea)

Visited places during my trip: Nairobi, Mount Kenya, Masai Mara National Park, Eldoret, Mombasa and Diani

Interesting facts:

-The ‘Big fives’ (lions, elephants, buffaloes, leopards and rhinoceros) are found all around the country. They are considered the five most difficult animals in Africa to hunt on foot.

-The sceneries of the Waltz Disney movie The Lion King were inspired by the Kenyan national parks.

-The black rhino is the most endangered specie in Kenya. Poachers are hunting them for their horns.

-Coffee is the country’s biggest income generator, followed by tourism. Ironically, most Kenyan don’t consume coffee which is considered an export product. They prefer tea and beer instead.

-The minimum legal wage is 160$/month.

-No matter the religion or gender of a person, polygamy became legal in Kenya last year!

-Kenya is one of the most corrupted country in the world..

My Kenyan highlight moments:

My Mount Kenya trekking is still my highlight of my African trip so far (see Mount Kenya Expedition) but I will also always remember my amazement during my first game drive in the Masai Mara. There is something very unique about seeing elephants, giraffes and buffaloes in the wild for the first time. Unfortunately I didn’t get the chance to see the ‘big five’ (I missed the lions, leopards and rhino) but I’m crossing my fingers to spot them during my travels around South Africa!